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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> very nice. >> all right. aside from that, we'll take a look at upbeat economic news out of china. the purchasing managers index rising to 50.9 in december. highest level since august. the surge also helped speculation the chinese government will take additional steps to support its economy. of the 15 times china's up 3%, since '09, s&p that day is up 13 times. almost every time. despite the futures today, is it a good omen for the markets here? >> look, there was a dichotomy in that government. there were people who were concerned about inflation. and there were people who said, listen, we're not growing fast enough. they do have a lot of levers. if they want to grow, i still -- i've been a bull on china. if they want to do 9%, 10%, they have the ability to do it. all they have to do is have a gigantic sewer infrastructure program. >> that's true. there's going to be an economic war conference held soon. it's believed the government will start to release growth forecast at that conference and perhaps unveil some further stimulus measures or tip their hat in terms of whether they
the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural parts of the country where the real problems are. on the don't's side, stop the empty talk. in china, niceties are often more formal and exaggerated than west. another one is don't stop traffic. if you've ever been to
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. li
saw that. i do think one thing we can certainly say given that china seems to be stabilizing a bit, we can all discuss europe. greek situation. maybe it's off the front pages for a while. and so if we assume that the jobs picture in the u.s. is not bad, let's assume not bad, it puts even more of a focus on the fiscal cliff negotiations because it becomes even more binding one would assume in terms of good or bad for the market, for the economy. >> kernen had a good point. does strength mean the economy could handle a cliff or is it so good you wouldn't want to tamper -- >> if i wanted to create a recession, what would i do? i would raise everybody's rates. i would cut the unemployment benefit. just trying to think of a theory of how i could cause a recession. i would cut back government spending quickly. >> i would raise interest rates to 20%. >> bernanke ought to join the -- look, i think this is what's going to happen. i think it's 50-50 we get a deal. no vacation. no legislation, no vacation. i think that when people get their paycheck at the end of january, they are going to be sho
have as in this for a while. i think there is always china, europe, and the congress that can miss this up. i think it is hard to stop this recovery. we have done everything we can to do it. we can do it again if we try hard. i think we will not succeed this time. >> we have not talked about the creation yet, which polling showed is a major concern for americans. for the long-term unemployed who have been left behind a little bit and then to the economic recovery, do you feel like the president and congress is doing enough to address the problem? what politically and realistically could be done in the next four years? >> i think the president is committed to this. i think he would like to see an extension of unemployment insurance. he would like to see it if possible an extension of the payroll tax cut. we just released a $4 trillion deficit revenue plan that calls for four and a billion dollars in short-term stimulus. we think there is a need for a infrastructure and roads and bridges. we think it has to happen sometime in the next 20 years. we have a situation with incredibly low
, americans take out insurance to rebuild their lives. but in china, no such luck. after beijing's worst downpour in decades washed out this home, he and his wife had to borrow $3100 in friends and relatives to rebuild, a small fortune on his meager salary. there's no such thing as homeowners insurance, he says. the industry here has been agreeing over the past decade, but still underdeveloped with private policies largely a foreign idea. in countries like the united states, homeowners insurance replaces pretty much whatever somebody owns. about you but here there is no such guarantees, so people are forced to salvage whatever they can on their own. as more chinese get richer, many are looking for ways two o prot their wealth and lives. >> people are some savings, a first car and all that, typically insurance product is actually a very good product for them. >> right now car insurance is popular. china is expected to become the second largest insurance market behind the u.s. by 2020. and the competition is fierce, still dominated by chinese players like picc. international insurers face
on housing and employment data, the global economy continues fragile with the european debt crisis and china i in in. >> rogoff is a professor of public policy and economics at harvard, he is a coauthor of the best selling book, this time is different, eight centuries of financial folly, many consider it to be the authoritative text on the impact of financial crisis around the world. i am pleased to have ken rogoff back on this program. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: let me start big, if i may. so i mean, how do you see as we enter a new year the global economy? >> well, to state the obvious, everybody is growing more slowly than they would like to, if at all. europe is basically flat, the u.s. is improving, but it is not exactly galloping and, you know, we are entering probably a weak quarter where people are hoping it will be stronger over the course of the year, china is slowing some and in general all of the emerging markets are slower than they were most of them india has slowed dramatically, brazil is slow, so yes, indeed it is a fragile situation, when the u.s. is one of the
tomorrow. >>> the world bank in the meantime is raising its 2013 economic growth forecast for china and for developing east asia. the organization says that the region remains resilient despite the lackluster performance of the global economy. the world bank sees china expanding by 8.4% next year. it's expecting that it will be fueled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. today's forecast is higher than an earlier one that was sited in a world bank report in october. 8.4%, not bad both if you can get it. >>> speaking of china, the united states is moving forward with plans to slap steep anti-dumping duties on wind turbine towers that are imported from china at prices that are deemed unfairly low. the news from the commerce department comes as u.s. officials welcomed a high-level chinese delegation for trade and economic talks. the u.s. trade panel has final approval over the duties and is expected to vote on the case in late january. >>> in corporate news, ubs hit with a $1.5 million fine today. that will add up, a few more of those. the swis
. if you look at the facts, 32% of our manufacturing base has been gutted and sold to china, india, any foreign country that has cheap labor. the top patriotic american companies are parking their profits and offshore accounts so they do not have to pay a fair share of their taxes. the bottom line is since the late '70s, the wealthiest 2% in this country are making 25 times their wealth that they made a black -- back then. there are only paying 40% more in taxes. this country is doomed if we do not start putting terrace of the imports coming into this country. the republican party is selling you an outright lie. thank you. host: let's show you a facebook posting. the economist and professor at the university of maryland will be with us and about 25 minutes or so. he will take your calls and give you his economic outlook for 2013. he has written a lot on the matter. from west virginia, independent. caller: is, sir. i would just like to say that i am not very optimistic above the future of the united states right now. we are in so much that it is pathetic. our budget is way over. this pre
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
market news, a lot of talk about china this morning. a final reading of hsbc's manufacturing purchasing manager's survey for china rising in november, first time above the key 50 mark which indicates expanding rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens
countries like turkey, india, china, russia, are helping them subvert sanctions they will stand by them an protect them even though they're widely exposed. adam: let's do a little bit of mathematics here. it is adding up what we've seen in the past few days. just yesterday the iranian regime said they were willing to let in nuclear inspectors if israel and their threat to attack was diffused and if western sanctions were to be eased. s what does that plus now the war exercises add up to? is the regime, on a precipice? are they falling and in turmoil or trouble? >> economically they certainly are. there is a lot of russelling going on the streets that the economy is not stable. they tried to do their own stimulus package a month ago and really didn't get much of a response. so the reel itself is failing. what they're doing to try to buy themselves political time while not giving away any posturing and letting their people know they're in fully control of their state, the region and they will not be pushed around. remember the other factor is the gulf cooperation council which has been un
.o. of big caterpillar equipment and talk about what's going on in china and i hope we get back to that. you're right that's all we're talking about instead of talking about caterpillar and what you do well as a great company. >> thank you. again, every time i come to the floor it's the hub of our greatness in this country of business. it's why we're here. it's really fun and exciting and let answer get into '13 and get into real things. i'm with you, joe. >> i know, but this deal has to play in peoria. >> it will play. >> compared to what you got in illinois now anything looks good. thanks. >> okay. >>> the executive chef tpz at jpmorgan the bank naming two chief officers to oversee things like anti-moneying. kayla tausche joins us. >> the person to watch everyone watching is looking at jez staly, he was chairman as of july largely viewed as a swank song role that rivals have taken note of. there were discussions over the ceo at legg mason, the baltimore asset manager. the talks fell apart and staly was the top of the short list for the board and recruiters after being serious talks for the
sachs to buy from neutral. citing increased potential for yum's operations in china. although, that's what we talk about all the time. kfc in china. that's the growth in their, i think isn't yum bigger than mcdonald's in terms of total number? >> yeah. >> i think subway is, too. research -- >> they don't even call it kentucky tried anymore. >> kfc. >> and it's really chicken. >> that's uncalled for. what do you think it is, cat? that is uncalled for. >> this is all i'll say. >> tastes like chicken. >> yes, it's chicken! if david novak -- >> taco bell. >> yeah, taco bell. >> is that really meat? is that your next -- >> no. all right. the restaurant -- research in motion, rim shares coming off a seven-month high on news that the u.s. immigrations and customs enforcement agent are going to use the blackberry 10 on a trial basis. that is on news, did you see this, that the agency is going to ditch the iphone in favor -- >> okay, so why? >> i don't know. i just want to say, so blackberry was one of the sponsors of the thing yesterday, at the dealbook conference and they showed off the bl
. take shoes in 1960, 98% of the choose were made in the u.s. 252%. wages in china are increasing. in the next two years consultants believe the u.s. will reshore about 3 billion in u.s. jobs as the wage differential shrinks making us more competitive. the u.s. maintains a edge in neurospace, heavy equipment world wide. american products have a reputation for quality and durability. while people are willing to pay more than that part of it is education. they say we need to rebrand u.s. goods in the mind of u.s. consumers as a value purchase. kelly: let's bring americans back by buying and investing in america. >> reporter: if there was a store for it i think probably more of us would do it. kelly: let's go out and create a business. jaime: means jobs. definitely. local police are calling this bon of the strangest cases ever. two young men vanish without a trace in an ideal i can new england river town. as we get reports that syria may have crossed president obama's red line by using chemical weapons within its borders we'll debate what the u.s. could do, if anything, in we are for
look at china in particular, they are looking for corporate bonds rather than u.s. treasury securities because they do not like what they see. we are living on borrowed time. we have created another bubble. my view is the reason the fed is doing that is because the mandate was changed in the late 70's to where they have to be concerned with unemployment. we need a fiscal deal. the fed has to change its policy because both are imprudent and unsustainable over time. >> right. >> one of the most successful physical consolidations in the developed, democratic world in canada, in the mid 1990's, and i ask the canadian politicians how did you do it? the public went from cheering on spending to deficits within a matter of a year or two. the government in canada now risks some peril if they do not balance their budget. the answer you most frequently get is all they had to do was say, 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill on the canadian debt, and the public immediately realized that was not a great idea. we cannot make that argument. we run these massive deficits and because inter
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)